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dc.contributor.authorAtalar, Elmas Gülcan
dc.contributor.authorUzbay, Tayfun
dc.contributor.authorKarakaş, Sirel
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-22T16:45:56Z
dc.date.available2017-02-22T16:45:56Z
dc.date.issued2016-11
dc.identifier.citationAtalar, E. G., Uzbay, T., & Karakaş, S. (2016). Modeling symptoms of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder in a rat model of fetal alcohol syndrome. Alcohol and Alcoholism, 51(6), 684-690. http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/alcalc/agw019en_US
dc.identifier.issn0735-0414
dc.identifier.issn1464-3502
dc.identifier.other000388524000008 (WOS)
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1093/alcalc/agw019
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11376/2950
dc.descriptionKarakaş, Sirel (Dogus Author) -- #nofulltext#en_US
dc.description.abstractSeveral studies indicate the similarity between the symptoms of fetal alcohol syndrome and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This study hypothesized that prenatal exposure to ethanol (EtOH) can be used as an animal model of ADHD in Wistar rats. At the first stage of the study, alcohol was delivered to the pregnant dams (237-252 g) by intra-gastric route throughout Gestation Days 8-20 at a dose of 6 g/kg/day. Untreated control group with isocaloric sucrose intubation was also included. Of the 16 male pups (174-180 g), 8 were in the fetal alcohol effects (FAE) group and 8 were in the untreated control group. Subjects went through behavior shaping, discrimination learning and reversal learning. Number of sessions to learn the tasks, response frequency to inhibitory (S-) and excitatory (S+) stimulus features, response latency and inter-response time (IRT) were measured. Significant differences were obtained on only the reversal task. Rats with FAE needed greater number of sessions to learn the reversal task, and they had a higher frequency of incorrect responses in specifically the latter part of the sessions. Our results suggest that reversal learning of FAE rats exhibits deficit in the inhibition of pre-learned responses. Responses behaviorally mimicked attention deficit and impulsivity symptoms of human ADHD. However, the experimental design of the study was not conducive to hyperactivity. Accordingly, rats with FEA can be an alternative to other models since it is not, for example, based on a symptom that is atypical (such as hypertension) to ADHD. Significant difference was obtained in a reversal task between male rats prenatally exposed to ethanol and matched controls. The greater number of sessions for learning and higher frequency of incorrect responses behaviorally mimicked symptoms of ADHD, suggesting that rats with fetal ethanol effects can serve as a useful animal model.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen_US
dc.relation.isversionof10.1093/alcalc/agw019en_US
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/closedAccessen_US
dc.subjectPrenatal Ethanol Exposureen_US
dc.subjectDeficit/Hyperactivity Disorderen_US
dc.subjectClinical-Implicationsen_US
dc.subjectPrefrontal Cortexen_US
dc.subjectAdult Ratsen_US
dc.subjectADHDen_US
dc.subjectReversalen_US
dc.subjectMemoryen_US
dc.subjectMethylphenidateen_US
dc.subjectHippocampusen_US
dc.titleModeling symptoms of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder in a rat model of fetal alcohol syndromeen_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.relation.journalAlcohol and Alcoholismen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDoğuş Üniversitesi, Fen Edebiyat Fakültesi, Psikoloji Bölümüen_US
dc.contributor.authorIDTR12488en_US
dc.contributor.authorIDTR135999en_US
dc.identifier.volume51en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.startpage684en_US
dc.identifier.endpage690en_US


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